Author: Trisha Chetani

In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker – Omkar Khatavkar

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interviewed our speakers over a few important questions. The conversations we had were just amazing. 

In this edition, we are publishing the Interview we did with Omkar Khatavkar. Omkar answered many interesting questions and we are sure you will enjoy the read.

Tell us a little about what inspired you to become a tester?
Omkar: When I started my career in Testing, I was not much sure about it. After I read books, blogs from James Bach I got really inspired. Exploratory Testing is one of the things which really inspired me in testing. With this kind of testing you find such bugs that you get very good appreciations from the developer itself. Some of the developers want me to test their code before they wanted to merge in Github.
How will your talk motivate the attendees and one lesson they will carry from the conference?
Omkar: My talk and presentation will help people to know how to build the infrastructure as code for the test environment. How they can scale and distribute it easily
With a continuous change in tech stack, how do you keep yourself updated?
Omkar: I usually attend new conferences, talks and mainly watch my twitter and Linkedin account where I do follow lot of interesting people from testing community to know the latest trends and tech stacks. I have a goal that every 1-2 months, I have to do some online course to help my learning.
If someone wants to contribute to open-source software, what tips do you have for them?
Omkar: If you want to contribute the open-source software, which you really like. then start to learn about the documentation and software. Try to use it, which help you to learn about it. If you find the defects try to file then in the issues list. Join their IRC or communication channel to tell them what was failing. If you are good enough to know about the coding and excited to run the code try to debug and give the solutions.
Please share about your project to analyze failures?
Omkar: This is one of the major pain points. We are currently using the tool called Report Portal which help us to gather the failures and analyze it with its AI capabilities. I have personally also written an open-source project testblame which we also use in our project which sends an email to contributors whose tests are failing.

 

According to you, what are some often neglected/missing elements in Automation Frameworks?
Omkar: Logging and Scaling a framework based on the new requirements are getting neglected and causing a cascading effect on time and efforts. One should always be effective on logging and know how we can scale the framework in the next iteration.

 


We thank Omkar: for his time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.  Register to Tribal Qonf happening 27-28 June 2020 here.

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In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker – Michael Bolton

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interviewed our speakers over a few important questions. The conversations we had were just amazing. 

In this edition, we are publishing the Interview we did with Michael Bolton. Michael answered many interesting questions and we are sure you will enjoy the read.

 

Tell us a little bit about what inspired you to become a tester?

Michael: Testing is interesting and fun!  I’ve done a lot of things in my career — tech support, programmer, documentor, program manager — and they were interesting and fun too.  All of those roles benefit from a tester’s mindset.

 

 What or who has been the greatest influence in your professional life?

Michael: I’ve been inspired by a number of people along the way — most importantly, Cem Kaner, James Bach, and Jerry Weinberg.

 

 How are you practising your skills during COVID-19?

Michael: James and I have been adapting our RST classes to present them all online.  That has involved writing software for exercises and discovering ideas as we go.  I’ve been doing a lot of online coaching and support work over the net, and a fair deal of writing, too.

The crisis, although horrifying, has been fascinating; we don’t usually get the opportunity to see science being done in real-time.  The story changes from day to day; from bad news to good news and back, over and over. That’s to be expected; science is a lot messier and more uncertain and more controversial than most people think.  But it’s also the best way we know to learn about things in the long run.

 

 What are the resources you recommend to people to learn more about management?

Michael: If you’re going to manage people, you’ll need to become a skilled observer, and you’ll need to learn to observe yourself, too. That’s hard to do, so it’s a good idea to find someone whose style you admire, who’s willing to observe you, and who’ll give you feedback and perspective.

Management is mostly about people, so it’s a good idea to study people and the way they work, individually and in groups.  Most of the time, it seems to me that managers don’t listen and learn enough from the people doing the work; they’re some of your greatest resources.  Management is also about clearing obstacles so that people can get things done, so I’d say it’s a good idea to study problem-solving skills, too — and to study the way things have gone wrong.

Once again, Jerry Weinberg’s stuff is wonderful:  Becoming a Technical Leader, and the Quality Software Management series.  Robert Austin’s book, Measuring and Managing Performance in Organizations is also terrific.

Other than that, most management books I’ve seen seem pretty weak to me.

 

How do you learn and develop diverse skills like a rap on the talk, showcasing magic tricks in the workshop you offer?

Michael: My first career was in theatre. I was an actor when I was a kid; I worked mostly on the technical when I was in university, and I was a stage manager after that. Throughout my time at university, I had a part-time job at a comedy club — not as a performer, but I hung around comedians.

Performance of any kind is like testing, too.  One way to do well is to choose easy stuff to do.  The magic tricks I do in classes are like that; they don’t take any skill at all, really.  The harder stuff depends on rewriting and redoing and revising — and getting feedback from thoughtful people. And most of them on study and practice; to the degree, any kind of skilled performance looks easy, natural and good, it’s usually because of conscious, deliberate practice.

You can’t be great at everything, but you can be good at lots of things. The trick is to get comfortable with things not going well at first. It’s okay to mess up. It’s normal.  It’s confusing and annoying, and frustrating, but it’s okay because that stuff goes away over time as we learn.

Little by little, we learn from our bugs. We tend to find more or them when we’re diligent about looking for them, and when we get other people to help us learn.  Being aware of the bugs is the first step towards fixing them.

 

We are aware that you are conducting RSTE classes online. How is it different from the BBST course?

Michael: The RSTE class focuses on Rapid Software Testing, which is a methodology developed by James Bach and me.  RSTE is taught live by its authors, and it’s being updated continuously.  There’s the direct interaction between the participants and the instructor that happens in real-time. We not only accept questions and discussion; we require them. The RSTE class is shorter than BBST, at 18 total hours of direct instruction time. That reflects a bias in RST: we aspire to the fastest, least expensive testing that still completely fulfills the testing mission.

BBST is a class of Cem Kaner’s design.  He credits James as a co-author (or at least he used to; I’m not sure if that’s still the case).  The content is delivered by video lectures. My understanding is that BBST represents a four-week commitment, at between 10 and 12 hours per week. That gives more time for long exercises and a broader overview of the testing landscape. In the design of the class, Cem placed a lot of emphasis on testers working with each other, in groups of four, asynchronously.  The facilitators work with the groups on steering the exercises towards Cem’s intended learning outcomes.

There aren’t many testing classes that we recommend other than our own, but BBST is one of them.

 

Testers don’t seem to track where their time is spent. How do you suggest one should track their time spent across activities so that they can justify their time on projects? 

Michael: What do we want?  What do our clients want?  They want to know about the status of the product, which we determine by performing tests and examining the product.  Do we feel like we’re being productive?  Does everyone agree that we are?  If so, don’t worry about tracking time at all.  If we’re concerned that we might not be as productive as someone might like, then we start looking at where we’re spending time.

The first principle of accounting for your time as a tester is to think in terms of inquiry, not control.  Note the time that we spend on designing and performing tests, and note the time that we spend on things that interrupt that activity (like bug investigation and reporting), that support it (like setup and follow-up work), and that might undermine it (like wrestling with inconsistent environments or waiting for resources that never arrive).  This doesn’t have to be very precise, as long as it’s reasonably accurate.  Make it visible and legible — that is, readable and understandable.  (There are examples here: Where does all that time go and here Breaking the test case addiction part 8)  Then ask “Is everyone okay with this?”  If they are, then don’t worry.  If they’re not happy, or if they’re unsure, go deeper, probing to understand and illustrate more and more specifically where time is going.

 


We thank Michael for his time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.  Register to Tribal Qonf happening 27-28 June 2020 here.

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In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker – Lavanya Mohan

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interviewed our speakers over a few important questions. The conversations we had were just amazing. 

In this edition, we are publishing the Interview we did with Lavanya Mohan. Lavanya answered many interesting questions and we are sure you will enjoy the read.

 

Tell us a little about what inspired you to become a tester?

Lavanya:

I had a professor in college who had taken up teaching after over 10 years of experience in IT because he had a passion for it. He taught us Software Testing and almost all his lectures were filled with either demos, real-life scenarios, or us trying different things practically.

He inspired us to do exploratory testing and scripting. I learnt a lot and also thoroughly enjoyed software testing. I believe he was one of the early influencers who set my career path in this direction.

 

What or who has been the greatest influence in your professional life?

Lavanya: There have been many people who have influenced me to a great extent in my professional life. Although it will not be practical to list them all here, I would like to take this opportunity to mention 2 people who I was lucky to work with on multiple projects – Anay Nayak and Anand Bagmar. They’re both masters in their craft, highly self-motivated, constantly seeking to learn more and improve things around them.

There are also many women testers I follow online (some of whom I have never met in person) who have had a great influence on me and who I look up to.

 

How are you practicing your skills during COVID-19?

Lavanya: With everyone working from home, I did start finding my (office) work hours getting longer and more chores to get done at home. Luckily I have supportive people around me. That coupled with a little self-discipline is helping me continue learning and practicing.

 

How will your talk motivate the attendees and one lesson they will carry from the conference?

Lavanya: In the talk, I hope to convey how clean test automation code can help readability and maintainability. I would like to show how we can identify not-so-clean code and then refactor step by step to make it better.

I hope that the attendees will have something to take back irrespective of whether they are new to test automation or highly experienced at test automation and have faced maintainability issues with their codebase.

 

You have worked in different contexts in your career, how has each experience shaped you as a professional?

Lavanya I have worn different hats – that of a QA, Test Automation Engineer, Software Developer, etc. in my career. I believe doing these different roles (especially early on in my career) helped me gain a wider knowledge of various areas in software development and delivery.

There is always a lot to learn irrespective of what role you play and you can always use those learnings in other areas as you move ahead in your professional life.

 

You have a gift for writing. Tell us more about your writing skills?

Lavanya I do enjoy writing even though I do not publicly post articles very often.

It helps me structure my thoughts and attain clarity.

I also like conveying my ideas in the form of short fictional stories so that they are more relatable to the readers. Some articles I have published in the past are here on this blog: https://bitweft.com/


We thank Lavanya for her time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.  Register to Tribal Qonf happening 27-28 June 2020 here.

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In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker – Davar Ardalan

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interviewed our speakers over a few important questions. The conversations we had were just amazing. 

In this edition, we are publishing the Interview we did with Davar Ardalan. Davar answered many interesting questions and we are sure you will enjoy the read.

 

Tell us a little about what inspired you to develop an interest in AI?

Davar: I’m Founder and CEO of IVOW bringing Cultural Intelligence to AI and focusing on addressing a much-needed market: the convergence of artificial intelligence to preserve culture with the need for marketers to better understand the culture. I was also a journalist at NPR News for many years. My last position was Senior Producer of the Identity and Culture Unit and as I looked ahead at the future of automation and AI, I knew that some of the same issue public media grapple with around the need to reach more diverse communities will be amplified in the age of AI.

I was also Managing Editor at Hanson Robotics working with Sophia the Robot, for the field of AI and personalization to be effective and culturally relevant, we must create comprehensive datasets to nurture cultural intelligence in machines and even in social robots like Sophia of Hanson Robotics, who has traveled to over 30 countries. Each time Sophia travels, she meets people of all different backgrounds who talk to her. Collecting culturally prominent datasets in an efficient and scalable manner today is paramount to the future commercial success of any AI solutions and products and inclusive AI.

 

How are you practicing your skills during COVID-19?

Davar: On June 9th we presented our Indigenous Knowledge Graph Demo and interactive report that features Sina, our AI on Google Assistant. I’m co-chair of Cultural AI for the 2020 AI For Good Summit. My team and I worked with six cultural experts including three Native American technologists on an Indigenous Knowledge Graph Demo focusing on the evolution of food.

See more here. In late May, leading up to NASA’s International Space Apps Challenge we featured our AI, Sina sharing stories about Covid19.

 

How will your talk motivate the attendees and one lesson they will carry from the conference?

Davar: How can testers prepare for the future of AI, testing, and personalization? Testing any AI platform like the one we are building is a complex task. We are collaborating with our technology partner, Kiwi-Tech as we build our platform and I’ll share some of our findings and strategies around data source and conditioning testing, algorithm testing, and API testing.

From an enterprise perspective, diversity in the tech workforce is critical to the future of innovation across the globe. Creating new AI-ready data featuring the stories of women in history, including the civic tech sector, can be a powerful way to bring visibility to the contributions of women and inspire future generations to join the tech workforce.

From a technology development standpoint, making AI and data culturally relevant is imperative as we develop technology that is usable, engaging, and beneficial to human thriving. Think of a Fitbit geared towards women, or a human resources AI that shares inspiring stories about women and technology.

AI-ready datasets on our global stories can only help us ensure that cultures around the world are preserved, enriched, used, shared, and loved as technology becomes an integral part of our lives. At IVOW, our north star is making data culturally relevant.

 

 Please tell us about the bots you have created to share information about Women in History?

Davar: As children, we learn our history through the stories our family and friends tell us about our community and where we come from. We can take the same approach to teach machines about our heritage, our communities, our myths, and legends. We understand the complex nature of the problem and therefore believe that deep collaboration, diversity, and transparency will lead to the best outcomes.

Take our digital storyteller Sina. She is a young conversational AI and at the moment a demo on Google Assistant. Sina is designed as an AI storyteller and built by our journalists and developers at IVOW, our startup developing cultural intelligence for AI. Sina has been around for a while, maybe longer than you. She loves learning about human history and then sharing those stories with others. That’s what gives Sina purpose.

So to make Sina and other AI’s smarter, together with TopCoder, we are launching our Women in History Data Ideation Challenge. That’s because we believe as storytelling technologists we have a role in designing this new future. Artificial intelligence tools must understand the cultural context and be able to respond to it effectively.

We know that AI algorithms and datasets are limited in understanding different cultural contexts, inhibiting the effectiveness of businesses and government from expanding into new markets and serving citizens. We can bring governments and businesses closer to the audiences they’re targeting. What’s missing is cultural intelligence and AI-ready datasets that are inclusive and diverse.

The goal of our first dataset ideation challenge is to explore how data on the stories of women throughout history can be sourced and used to gain new insights for AI products and services with a focus on women. The challenge will be conducted in collaboration with TopCoder, the world’s largest on-demand digital talent platform. The dataset and methodology ideation is only a first step, but an exciting and critical step towards creating culturally relevant AI that is truly useful to society. The final winning methodology will appear on AI-Commons.

 

 


We thank Davar for her time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.  Register to Tribal Qonf happening 27-28 June 2020 here.

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In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker- Pradeep Soundararajan

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interviewed our speakers over a few important questions. The conversations we had were just amazing. 

In this edition, we are publishing the Interview we did with Pradeep Soundararajan (CEO Moolya Testing & AppAchhi). Pradeep answered many interesting questions and we are sure you will enjoy the read.

 

Trisha: Tell us a little about what inspired you to become a tester?

Pradeep: Before I begin my story, I wanted to share with everyone that at this time in the world, we are going through a lot of challenges. What has happened to George Floyd is unacceptable and we all must stand together and restore humanity.

In 2002, I designed a Bluetooth-based ECG system during my time at an engineering college. I wanted to convert the design to a working prototype and I consulted cardiologists who then referred me to a couple of companies in Chennai and Bangalore. In my search to convert that to a prototype, I knocked on the door of a start-up that was working on Bluetooth that happened to be Impulsesoft. They liked what I had done but found it not aligned to their business goals but instead offered me a job to test Bluetooth Audio products post my completion of bachelors. I didn’t know that testing was a full-time job. I took it up because working on Bluetooth was that young boy’s dream.

I started to enjoy testing. I became obsessed with it. To the extent that I lived 24/7 in office. However, when I saw the parity between a programmer and a tester, I wanted to then become a full-time programmer (like many people around that time) and was getting coached by Sridhar Krishnamurthy, who was a developer and an architect in Impulsesoft. One day during our regular Bhel Puri session, he pulled me aside to tell me something that changed my life. He said, “Dey Pradeepa, I have worked with plenty of good programmers but hardly with people who are passionate about testing. I see that you have a natural flow with testing and I think you should stick to it for the long term”. That day, obsession turned into a vision.

 

Trisha: What or who has been the greatest influence in your professional life?

Pradeep: This is a tough question because there are many. I have thanked some people in the book I published – Buddha in Testing and hence will choose a list of people different from the list in the book.

I went for an early morning walk today and was listening to BeGees songs. The thought that struck me was – “Such pleasure it is to listen to them and have I been taking them for granted”. We tend to take simple things for granted. We don’t know how to measure the impact of simple things so instead of talking about “greatest” influence, I am going to talk about “simplest” influence whose impact I may not be able to measure or grasp.

  • Pooja Shah– Singing a parody of “My name is Antony Gonsalves” with a Testing Twist at Appium Conference 2019.
  • Manoj Kumar– Who gave up his slot for someone else to speak at Appium Conference 2019.
  • The team at the Ministry of Testing for absorbing all the losses due to COVID19 and yet putting a great Test Bash Home
  • Mahesh Chikane– For removing the restriction of time for early bird fees to enable more testers to be a part of Tribal Qonf during the COVID19 times.
  • Janet Gregory– for putting her calmness ahead of talent.
  • Sam Connelly– for the courage to blog sensitive personal topics to benefit people going through similar experiences.
  • All my colleagues in Moolya Testing who have helped me become a better person.

 

Trisha: How are you practicing your skills during COVID-19?

Pradeep: Practice is an important word. We take practice for granted. We all love one or the other sports star. What we fail to learn from them is this beautiful word called “practice”.

People, when they get to a job and get working for a while, think they are an ace at it. They get so busy with work without realizing that they have got busy because they didn’t practice.

For me, writing is a great way to sharpen the brain. It is difficult to write well unless there is clarity in the brain. It can mean writing anything, writing code, or writing a blog. So, I write. Oh, by the way, I started a new blog recently called Deep Test. https://moolya.com/deeptest/

 

Trisha: How will your talk motivate the attendees and one lesson they will carry at the TTT conference?

Pradeep: I have transitioned from being a contract tester to full-time tester to being an independent consultant, being a businessman, and also a Product Owner of a Test Tool.

I had the opportunity to see ‘Inside Out’ and ‘Outside In’ of Testing. I think it is important for people with ‘Inside Out’ view to see the ‘Outside In’ perspective. I wish someone had told this to me a long time ago. Nevertheless, it becomes my duty to help people see it.

What people take from my talk depends on their biases, their ability to learn, and unlearn. I would be a facilitator at best with the hope that this helps people gain new perspectives that can change their future for good.

 

Trisha: Please share with us being a CEO, how do you keep employees motivated?

Pradeep: Motivation is needed for people who are down. People become down with things that they are afraid of in 2014, I had an enlightenment moment about people, their insecurities, and how it drives them to think and fear things. At Moolya Testing, we breed the culture of courage. We breed the culture of making mistakes, learning from it, and not being punished for it (except unethical ones).

This provides a safe zone for people to discover themselves. A colleague of mine completed 5 years in Moolya, a few days ago. I called him up and asked him, “What has been in Moolya for 5 years done to you?” and he replied, “I am a transformed man. I feel light, think straight, have fewer emotions, don’t fear much, solve problems, and move forward”.

I guess this is the best I can hear from my people. My transformation is linked to their transformation.

 

Trisha: Please share with us more about V level people?

Pradeep: Here is the hierarchy of the business.

The shareholders -> The board -> The C level -> The V Level -> The D Level – The M Level -> The L level – The S Level -> The J level.

The true boss of a company is the shareholders. The V level is where Vision starts to get translated to Reality. The V level people are tasked to achieve a certain goal. It could be a revenue goal – an engineering goal or an employee goal.

They are not people who are hands-on but are responsible to recruit the team who will execute and support them in their execution. CTO is someone who is across the tech of a company whereas a VP Engineering is a person who translates a roadmap to sprints and releases. CTO and VP Engineering may also jointly define things.

 

Trisha: Could you please share with us how you tackle the challenge of running a business during COVID-19?

Pradeep: COVID19 has thrown the biggest leadership challenge to most organizations. Companies with deep pockets and the business aligned on online commerce are happy companies today. Running a business during these times is very dynamic. The situation keeps changing every week and we don’t have control over it.

I am sad to see people lose jobs across the world. I live by the principle of Ubuntu. If I am having my job and pay today – it doesn’t mean I have a reason to be happy. How can I be happy when many people have lost jobs. In Moolya we prevented job losses so far because of the diverse portfolio of customers. However, I know many testers write to me every day about having lost jobs and I am not happy that I am unable to recruit all of them.

Good news, we are also onboarding new customers who can compensate for some of the customers who had to bring down the curtain on some projects.

Thanks to my practice of non-religious spirituality that has kept me super calm and focused on what I need to do. Thanks to my fellow Moolyans who support and they are my masters. They are great masters and I am an average servant. They still haven’t fired me.

 

Trisha: How do you work with every Moolya employee enabling them to be successful?

 

Pradeep: Today we are about 200 people. We would be growing to 500 once the COVID situation gets over. I can’t work with everyone in Moolya. That is where culture plays a big role. Culture is what can touch every employee of the company, not the Founder. The Founder at best can touch 10 people. The 10 people that the Founder touches should have the ability to precipitate the culture.

From that perspective – I think I have a fantastic team. Two people in the core leadership team are testers who joined us as Freshers. Amit Vyas today heads Fulfilment. Abi heads Solutions. The rest of the people in my team came in laterally. It is a great mix and people in Moolya see that age or number of years of experience is not what gives people growth. It is true the ability to learn fast and unlearn super fast.

Culture is the toughest things to build. Culture can take the company far.


 

We thank Pradeep for his time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.

Register to Tribal Qonf happening on 27-28 June 2020,  here

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In Conversation with Tribal Qonf Speaker – James Bach

To connect our Tribal Qonf Speakers and Audience better, we interview our speakers over a few important questions. The result was just amazing. We are sure you will love this.

 

Trisha: Tell us a little bit about what inspired you to become a tester?

James Bach: I was hired to be a tester. I didn’t seek it. But what inspired me to dedicate my career to testing is that I enjoy doing analysis and critique, I don’t enjoy building things, and I have the sense that the field of testing is a complete shambles. No one I spoke with about testing seemed to understand it, and I felt that I could re-invent testing as a skilled craft.

 

Trisha: What or who has been the greatest influence in your professional life?

James Bach: Jerry Weinberg. He gave me a role model of what a tough intellectual who cares about people can look like.

 

Trisha: How are you practicing your skills during COVID-19?

James Bach: My research continues almost unchanged, except that I do even more online meetings than I used to. I do a lot of online coaching and conferring with colleagues.

 

Trisha: How will your talk motivate the attendees and one lesson they will carry at the TTT conference?

James Bach: I don’t know the answer to that. But I hope the audience will get a taste of what serious testing looks like.

 

Trisha: Please share with us more about how you test on different software domains For example. ML, IOT?

James Bach: If you specify a domain, then I will tell you how I might approach that differently than other things. For instance, machine learning is data intensive. The major challenge with machine learning is selecting the right training data because there will be built-in biases. We need to detect these biases, which means we must analyze sources of potential bias. We are going to need a high degree of tool support and an active exploration of the product.

 

Trisha: How would you recommend software testers to organize the work so they can spend most of their time doing actual testing?

James Bach: We need to take control of our work processes. I am amazed at how testers allow their ways of working to be dictated by people who are not testers and know nothing about testing. Electricians, plumbers, doctors, lawyers, chefs, and basically every skilled vocation you can think about has agency. If you hire an electrician and tell him you want him to use wires that have no insulation, he won’t go along with that. The answer will be no. Why is it that only testers are expected to write and follow “test case” documents when literally no one you can think of works by writing “cases” and then following them? Do managers script their management work before they do it? No. So why do they tell us to?

My advice is: assert yourself. Don’t be bullied into doing bad work.

 

Trisha: Please share with us how testers should identify the most important work?

James Bach: That is called product risk analysis. There are numerous heuristics we might use to get a sense of where the risk is. For instance, complex code or frequently changing code typically leads to trouble, so I want to test that first and most. In general, you need to understand the product quite well to imagine the kinds of problems it might have, and only through that imagination will you choose the right parts of the product to test and how much to test them.

 

Trisha: Please share with us why you recommend a manager, product owner, developers should not guide how testers should organize their work?

James Bach: Anyone can HELP guide testing. I welcome that. But if you mean CONTROL, then my simple reason why non-testers should not control testing is they are not qualified to do so. If you hire a doctor, a lawyer, a plumber, or a baker– anyone skilled– you will find that they don’t allow you to control how they work.

Why should testers allow non-testers to control testing?

 


We thank James Bach for his time and energy to do this amazing interview. Stay tuned to hear from more Speakers.  Register to Tribal Qonf happening 27-28 June 2020 here.

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